A Guide to Mackerel Fishing

Mackerel are the closest thing we get in the UK to tuna and though they may be a wee bit smaller, they’ve got that same line-strippin spirit. The two fish are actually closely related, and have in common a terrific ability to swim huge distances with powerful, muscular movement that makes for great fun for anglers with well balanced tackle. Mackerel move around in mindless, hungry shoals, although in winter you often encounter little groups with much chunkier fish. Shaped like torpedo’s, with their almost psychedelic blue and green stripes, this is a fish that inspires artists and anglers alike and is well worth targeting. If you buy any of the products I recommend, I may earn a commission from Amazon. My favourite mackerel lure that I can’t fish without is this trusty Japanese-style mackerel lure from Amazon. It outperforms feathers by 3x every time in my experience.

Contents

fishing on mevagissey wall

How to catch mackerel for beginners (skip if experienced)

Traditionally, mackerel were caught with mackerel feathers, which literally meant using feathers from chickens and tying them to hooks, much like fly fishing. If your goal was to maximise your chances of catching as many mackerel as possible, this would be your approach.

  1. Get a 9-10ft fishing rod that can cast up to 3oz, some mackerel feathers and a few lead weights.
  2. Attach the string of hooks which come pre-tied to the end of your line with a strong knot, such as the blood knot.
  3. Attach the lead weight to the end of the string of feathers
  4. Cast out into deep water from a harbour, rocks or pier around high tide
  5. Reel in your mackerel, dispatch quickly.
  6. BBQ time!

The Rod: Ideally you want a spinning rod 9ft in length like this basic one from Amazon. This is long enough to allow for long casting but short enough to give more mobility and enjoyment from using a lighter set up compared to a beach caster.

The Reel: A fixed spool reel in size 4000-6000 like this one from Amazon. Reels that are too large are only going to make your retrieval too fast, and a reel too small will have the opposite effect. You’ll have more fun with a smaller reel, but if it’s too small the 20lb line won’t lay well and you’ll get tangles, so you need quite a large spool. It’s also very important that the reel is of an appropriate size for the rod, otherwise the set up will feel clunky and you may have problems. Go for size 5000 with a 9ft medium weight spin rod like the one recommended above.

The Lure: Classic mackerel feathers like these on amazon. These do get lost easily in snags so I’d recommend bringing more than you think you need to avoid disappointment on the day! Simply tie these onto your mainline. The hooks on Sabiki feathers result in more hook ups, but take care as the line is also lighter and more prone to snapping.

The Sinker: Some Beach bomb lead weights like these on amazon. 2-3oz is perfect for shore fishing with feathers because you can get a lot of distance with a weight like this on a 9ft spinning rod without the weight sinking too quickly, forcing you to retrieve faster or getting stuck in snags.

The Line: 20lb monofilament line like this from Amazon.

mackerel fishing fun

Spinning for Mackerel

Spinning for mackerel means casting out a lure which imitates a small fish, and retrieving it in such a way that gets the attention of a hungry mackerel so that it takes a bite. Mackerel rely hugely on sight for hunting, and so anything that glimmers in the water is going to get their eye. Even a bare hook with nothing on it will catch mackerel when they’re feeding, if it’s silver. The main considerations when spinning for mackerel are location and timing. Once you’ve got those two things sorted, you’re going to need to be able to get your lure to the fish and keep it in the right layer in the water column. That means you want a lure that is going to sink quickly enough to get it where you want it – that will vary depending on the depth the mackerel are feeding at. A really light lure may take so long to sink that you waste time waiting around, and a lure that’s too heavy will sink so fast you can’t keep it up in the water column without reeling in like a mad man.

Mackerel Fishing Season

fishing for mackerel

The mackerel season varies depending on where you are in the UK. In the south, the mackerel run usually begins in late Spring. In the far north, the season can begin later, mid to late summer.

In June and July, colossal spawning shoals of mackerel break up into smaller shoals which ascend the shallows around the British coast. They feast like teenagers on herring, sprats, sandeels and whatever they can find to snap at. After the mania of Spring is over, the mackerel stick around in the coast into Autumn and beyond.

Then in November, they disappear into the depths, where researchers believe they linger around the bottom near the continental shelf, in dense shoals. They swim as if half awake in offshore pits, feeding around the bottom and waiting for February, when they make their way back to the shallows and split off into somewhat smaller shoals again. Then the frenzy begins once more, feeding on plankton and krill and whatever lure you throw at them. Once the fish are one year old, they are big enough to eat.

Where to Catch Mackerel

where to catch mackerel

Mackerel are one of those rare fish species that are still quite abundant in British waters, despite being delicious. You’ll catch them around piers and harbour walls with deeper water all across the country.

Mackerel hunt all throughout the water column, depending on where the food is. A good place to start looking for them with your bait or lures is the middle of the water column. You may find that they are feeding close to the surface, or in winter they are often closer to the bottom as there are far fewer bait fish around. When I arrive at a fishing mark, if others are catching mackerel the first thing I will ask is ‘how deep are you fishing’.

Boat fishing for mackerel is the by far the most effective way to target the fish, since you can cover more ground and aren’t limited to one area. Boat fishing for mackerel is whole different ball game, and requires far heavier lead weights if you’re fishing in deep water or trolling. Lighter lead weights under 4oz aren’t going to sink fast enough to stay low in the water while being pulled along by a boat.

Best Mackerel Lures & Spinners

Using single lures is what most people want to do after they’ve caught a few hundred mackerel and are bored of using mackerel feathers and catching four in a go. There are a few types of mackerel lures and I’ll explain which are my favourites and why.

Mepps SpinnersWorld’s Prettiest Lure? View on Amazon

These spinners work a treat for mackerel and are pretty as an earing. This is a classic lure, though it can only be fished without a weight on the lightest tackle. If you are new to fishing, I would not recommend fishing with lures that require additional weight, as it makes the rig more complex, more prone to tangles, and harder to remain in contact with so you miss bites. Having said that, if you enjoy ultra light angling methods, fishing with a tiny cute little mepps spinner is pure art. Little mepps spinners gently flutter down the water column, falling in such a way that gets attention. The reason they aren’t particularly practical most of the time is because they don’t cast far without a weight and because they’re so light it’s challenging to keep the lure at the depth the mackerel are feeding at. If a fast retrieve in the middle column of the water is required, the lure can’t do it.

What they lack in practicality – being so light and not very aerodynamic, they make up for in aesthetic appeal! However, a modern casting jig like this one from Amazon is objectively superior. It casts further, falls in just as impressive fluttering motion and allows for direct contact with your line and the lure, rather than having contact with a lead weight as would be required with most set ups using a sub 20g mepps spinner.

Dexter WedgeView on Amazon

This is a classic lure, it’s essentially an old fashioned casting jig. The lure has the huge advantage of providing its own weight, which means you have direct contact with the lure and your rod. Some other spinning rigs separate the lure and the weight so that you don’t have this direct connection, which is almost never a good idea. The dexter wedge is cheap, simple and does the job. However, they snag very easily with their often large treble hooks which are frequently oversized for most inshore species. Wedges typically come with large treble hooks which are ineffectual in the mouths of mackerel, which bite in snaps rather than by engulfing the lure like a bass or pollack which use movement of water to suck prey in. If you were fishing over rough ground, you wouldn’t use one because the treble hooks cause it to snag easily. Fishing with a small dexter wedge that weighs under 1oz with a small treble would be ideal when targeting mackerel over sandy ground, or when trawling over sandy ground from a boat. The lure remains extremely popular for good reason. It’s a classic.

Casting jigs View on Amazon

Perhaps I am biased as a light game angler but casting jigs are perfectly designed for mackerel fishing and are superior to every other lure by quite a long way. These lures are extremely aerodynamic, so they cast further than any other lure shape, allowing you to cover much larger areas of ground.

They are designed like spinners to flutter down the water column as they fall, and to wobble a bit as they are retrieved like a dexter wedge. Crucially, the hooks on these lures are typically smaller than the one’s you find on more traditional lures, which increases your hook up rate. Mackerel do not engulf lures like bass or pollack, but rather they snap at them. This is why when retrieving a spinner you often feel a series of taps on the lure before you hook up. Smaller hooks increase the chance you will hook up. They do however make unhooking fish harder, and so its better to dispatch the mackerel if you can before unhooking it to get the job done humanely. If you’re fishing catch and release for mackerel, which you can only do if you’re able to grab the hook and not make any contact with the fish, then using a casting jig with a single hook instead of a treble is the best approach. Very few people have the skill to do this.

Casting jigs were originally designed by the Japanese, along with all the rest of the best fishing tackle you can buy. They are designed for jigging from boats, which is a method whereby you fish directly down the side of the boat, lift up the rod sharply and then allow the lure to flutter down towards the seabed again. The method is effective because it allows your lure to spend a higher percentage of its time falling downwards, rather than being pulled at an angle. Fish are more likely to strike when the lure is falling than when it’s moving sideways, perhaps because they are hardwired to seek easy meals from injured baitfish. This may be less important for mackerel, since they will hit almost anything, but the nonetheless the casting jig is perfectly suited to spinning from harbours and rocks for mackerel.

Soft Plastics With ShineView on Amazon

The art of presenting soft plastics just right on a perfectly weighted jig head holds a lot of appeal. It also allows you to target a far broader range of species. A lot of less impulsive species won’t go anywhere near standard mackerel feathers. Soft plastics will allow you to target a wide range of predators at the same time as mackerel. Mackerel tend to take snappy bites rather than gulps. Mackerel will snap at lures which means it usually takes multiple attacks until you get a hook up with soft plastics. This effect is more pronounced as lures increase in size. So, it’s a trade off, do you want to target a larger range of species at once but reduce somewhat the number of mackerel you hook? 

Plugs – Bass Surface Fishing Lure – View on Amazon

Mackerel can be caught with really fancy small plugs that you can and for tackle tarts this will prove the most interesting approach, though not the most effective, due to the lack of control over the depth your lure swims at. Mackerel will often be feeding at a certain depth and you need to figure out what that depth is. Plugs don’t allow you to do this without retying on a new one! However, there’s something glorious about a well-made plug and mackerel certainly won’t refuse them. The surface lure I’ve linked above catches mackerel as by-catch while targeting bass. It’s not ideal for mackerel, but for bass it’s the undoubted king of surface lures and there’s no more fun way of catching mackerel than taking them from surface!

Spinning retrieval styles

The way you retrieve the lure while spinning is very important. Retrieval speed is going to determine the depth your lure is swimming at and the way that it is moving through the water. It used to be believed that fish were like dinosaurs, and could only see things that moved. With this in mind, the emphasis was on designing lures to make a lot of movement. If you are in this camp, you will twitch your lure a lot and make it dance for the fish. Personally, I have found that a steady retrieve with perhaps the odd twitch to be more effective. The main thing with your retrival is that you create a mental image of where your lure is in the water. In your first cast, it’s a good idea to cast out, let your lure sink, keep a tight line, and count how long it takes to go slack. With experience, you just intuitively know how long it will take for your lure to reach the bottom, and you can change the depth you fish at based on your awareness of how long it needs to sink for to reach the seabed. You should also drop your lure in the water in front of you and watch it fall and see what it does when you twitch it. This also helps you to have more control over how you present your lure.

If you are fishing with a weight over 2oz, then you may need to lift the rod and use the rod to move the lure through the water, followed by retrieving in the slack. This is called ‘sink and draw’, though sometimes sink and draw refers to allowing the lure to really sink, rather than merely remain static for a while as the angler retrieves a rod length of slack. The goal with this is for your line to never quite be slack, so after pulling your rod back, you want to retrieve the slack at the same pace you move your rod back down to the starting position. You get the hang of it pretty quickly, just make sure your line is always tight when you’re retrieving.

mackerel on float

Float Fishing for Mackerel

Float fishing is excellent for the sporting and the lazy, as it offers a style of fishing that is tantalizing and exciting. Watching a float jerk up and down a bit or else suddenly disappear into the depths is a real thrill. It’s important that you use an appropriately sized float. You want a float that will stay visible and above water even in choppy water, but not so large that smaller fish can’t drag it under. It’s easiest to buy premade float rigs to save yourself time. Typically, people fish with size 1-0 hooks, but this makes it harder to catch garfish and is a bit big for mackerel too, so something smaller like a size 4 is preferable. There are different types of hooks that are useful in different conditions.

You’re best off starting fishing in the middle of the water column as that’s the most likely place you’ll encounter mackerel, though you should experiment with shallower and deeper depths if the mid water isn’t getting you any action.

A common mistake made while float fishing is to assume that fishing further out is better. Very, very often most of the fish in an area are closer to your feet. I’d feel more confident not casting at all and fishing a few metres beyond my feet than I would casting as far as I could, so long as I was fishing a mark with reasonably deep water. Typically, fishing about 10m out is a good place to start. This is because fish love structure. It’s one of the most basic principles of fishing: fish near structure. The reason fish congregate around harbours is because the structure provides safety for smaller fish, which in turn attracts predators. If you’re deep sea fishing, you look for wrecks. If you’re fishing an estuary, you look for gullies, drop offs and pits. Experiment fishing at different distances, but try fishing in the full range from your feet to the furthest point you can cast to, rather than only fishing as deep out as possible.

mackerel targeting

Best Mackerel Fishing Baits

If you’re targeting mackerel with bait, you may be amused or disturbed to learn that the mackerels favourite food is mackerel. Other baits, such as sandeel, ragworm and lugworm are also effective, in that order. Sandeel are convenient to hook because you can just follow the shape of the fish. These can be brought frozen from most tackle shops. The advantage of using mackerel as bait is that once you’ve caught one in theory you should never need to buy bait again, because you can use the fish to catch more. The best bait for mackerel is sandeel or mackerel, but the most important thing is not the bait but the presentation.

Best Mackerel Fishing Rods

You don’t need high end kit for having some fun with mackerel. With that in mind, I’d recommend this basic setup from Amazon for Spinning With feathers.

The rod you want for mackerel fishing depends on whether you will be primarily float fishing, spinning with casting jigs or using mackerel feathers. Basically, for catching loads of mackerel get a 9ft spinning rod, use 2oz lead weights, 20lb line and sabikki feathers. 

Best Mackerel Rods for Lure Fishing 

After catching a million mackerel with feathers, some people want to start using something lighter and targeting a wider range of species. A light weight spinning rod like this one on amazon is the answer. These rods have been developed dramatically by Japanese manufacturers to cast lighter and lighter weights while still having surprising power. These really light spinning rods are sometimes referred to as LRF rods (max casting weight 5-15g) or HRF rods which cast around an ounce. These rods were originally developed for catching the horse mackerel, which is known as ‘AGI’ in Japan and is prized for eating. They make for excellent fishing in UK waters, unsurprisingly! Mackerel on kit this light will tear line out of your drag and fight HARD. 

Best Travel Rods for Mackerel Fishing 

If you want a rod that you can easily take on a plane in standard hold luggage or just have ready in the back of your car for all circumstances, you’ll want a travel rod. If you buy this one from Amazon, you have every fishing situation taken care of, where ever you are. Travel rods are convenient and create more occasions on which you can fish. The problem with travel rods is that they tend to be weaker and have less power than standard rods. I know many people that have broken their travel rods and I myself snapped one first cast after arriving at a remote lake in New Zealand, which was frustrating.

The only solution to this is to set your drag generously and not make the rod take quite so much grunt as you might normally. Alternatively, you can buy a high end model like the one linked above and just take good care of it. 

What’s the best rod and reel for Mackerel fishing? 

You have a few options which all work well for mackerel fishing.

  • A beach caster allows you to cast further and haul heavier loads of fish. You really can’t go wrong with a set up like this one on Amazon – and you’re never going to break the thing, whatever monster you hook!
  • A medium weight spinning rod like this on Amazon is best for most people, as it still allows you to haul 4-5 mackerel on feathers and cast a long way, while having a lot more fun than you might have with a beach caster, since you will feel the fish fight and get a lot more action.
  • A light weight spinning outfit, with a single lure. This is the ultimate sport fishing approach. It’s more of an artform and less utilitarian. A rod like this one on Amazon will be a dream to fish with.
  • LRF and HRF fishing rods allow for the finesse approach to fishing. The lines used with this more advanced fishing style allow for long distance casting. On these set ups, mackerel strip line and can only just be lifted up the harbour wall. The rods won’t break from fighting fish, as they are designed to absorb a lot of power. Here’s an LRF starter kit on Amazon that casts slightly more than most LRF set ups, so is perfect for fishing with kids.

Best Boat Rods for Mackerel

If you’re kayak fishing for mackerel, of course you will want a far shorter rod, that is robust enough to survive the seas. This one on Amazon does the trick. I have taken longer rods out before and because they are clumsy it’s easy to drop them in. Watching the rod slowly drift down into the depths is not an experience I’d like to repeat. Despite being a self-confessed tackle-tart I prefer fishing with cheaper ice-pike fishing rods from the kayak if I’m trawling for mackerel since they can really take a heavy beating and it doesn’t matter too much if they get bullied a lot by the salt and waves etc. I would also recommend fishing with a weight of 2oz or under while kayak fishing for mackerel since this gives your feathers more time to sink to the bottom, reducing the number of snags you get, while still not preventing you from reaching the depths in good time.

Horse Mackerel vs Normal Mackerel

Horse mackerel do not have any blue or green markings, and are greyish silver in colour. They also have larger eyes and spines on their dorsal fin which Scomber Scombrus lack.

Scad Mackerel, also known as Horse Mackerel, are a fish that have changed the world of angling forever. In the UK they aren’t considered an exciting fish. They are not actually very closely related to mackerel, and indeed don’t resemble them much in appearance. Their colours are dull silvery grey. They have large, plate-like scales which are rough to touch. They have spines which make touching them live and twitching likely to get you cut, and they don’t even taste very nice. They are also bony, and have ugly large eyes. On the fish IQ scale, these fish come out near the bottom, as they roam the sea in mindless shoals smashing into anything that glimmers at them.

dogfish

However, in Japan, scad which are known as ‘Aji’ by the Japanese, are seen as a delicacy. Their flesh is eaten raw as sashimi. For this reason perhaps, the Aji has received a lot of attention from Japanese anglers, and a whole new style of fishing was developed in order to make targeting them more rewarding. In the UK, we now call it LRF (Light Rock Fishing). The style involves the use of rods that cast a maximum of 10g (1/3 ounze) and often they cast a maximum of 5g. These rods are modern, slick and nothing like the tackle more commonly recruited in the UK. Major brands have jumped on the LRF bandwagon in the UK and refer to their lightest spinning rods as ‘LRF’ because they cast 1oz only. However, a rod that casts 1oz is 3-4x heavier than an LRF rod.

The best way to catch scad mackerel in the UK is to use casting jigs or sabiki feathers with small hooks, owning to their small mouths. Scad are commonly caught at night in late summer and the depths of winter. You may see them under lit areas at 2am in your local estuary.

Mackerel Fishing Q&A

What is the best month to catch mackerel?

May-June is the best time to catch mackerel, although they are caught all summer in numbers and larger specimens are sometimes caught in winter.

Where do you find mackerel?

Mackerel are a pelagic species which means they constantly roam the open seas. They are found at a range of depths and can be caught from the shore and offshore in boats. 

What size hooks for mackerel?

The most common sized hook for mackerel is a size 1O, but these are considered too large by many. There is a Japanese alternative to traditionally sized mackerel feathers which is far superior, called Sabiki feathers. 

Are mackerel in yet?

Mackerel are usually in from late April onwards but this varies by year and location. 

Do mackerel die after being handled?

Yes, a study has shown that after being handled mackerel die due to the burning of their skin from the natural oils in human hands. Wetting your hands does not help. 

What lures to use for mackerel?

The best lure for catching lots of mackerel are mackerel feathers or Sabiki feathers. The most fun way is arguably with a single spinner or a float rod fishing rod. 

What is the best bait for mackerel?

The best bait for catching mackerel is either a sandeel or strip of mackerel, but lures are also highly effective. I recommend the spinners listed on this page alongside Japanese Sabiki feathers for more hook ups. Fishing with baited mackerel feathers allows you to catch mackerel as well as other species. 

What is the best time to catch mackerel?

The best time to catch mackerel is dusk or dawn and at high tide. Spring high tides are often the best as they push bait fish closer into shore and the mackerel follow them in. Mackerel can be caught anytime, however. 

What tide is best for mackerel fishing?

The best tide for mackerel fishing is a spring high tide. These are tides when the difference between high water and low water is at its greatest, and the flow of water is strongest. Big tides push bait fish closer into shore and mackerel follow them in. 

What fish can you catch with a spinner?

Bass, mackerel, pollack and even wrasse will take spinners and other lures and can be effectively targeted in this way. Presentation and retrieval style is key and varies by species. 

What colour lure is best for mackerel?

Mackerels’ natural prey tend to be silvery white and therefore bright, shiny lures are often considered the best. These reflect light which increases their visibility to the fish. It’s often said that the colours of lures are there to catch the anglers rather than the fish!

What’s the best lure for mackerel fishing at night? 

The best lure for mackerel fishing at night is either a shiny lure to make the absolute most of whatever light is available, or a UV lure which glows in the dark. These lures are the best for fishing at night because they stand out so much more to the fish with their glow. In order for UV lures to work you must shine a light on them for a while first. 

What’s the best mackerel fishing gear? 

The best mackerel fishing gear is a simple spinning set up with an 8-9ft rod, 16lb monofilament line and mackerel feathers such as these Japanese sabiki feathers. The most fun way to catch mackerel however is with a light game set up. 

Best mackerel fishing lure length?

Mackerel do not have particularly large mouths relative to other species such as bass and pollack and a common mistake is to fish with lures which are too large. Avoid soft plastics with long paddle tails. 2 inches is perfect for mackerel fishing. 

Mackerel fishing off the beach?

You can fish for mackerel off the beach but this tends to work best at beaches where the water gets deep very quickly or when you know lots of bait fish are being pushed close into shore. 

Where can I fish for mackerel in Cornwall?

You can fish for mackerel all along the coastline, but harbours and rock marks that give you immediate access to deeper water are the best for catching mackerel. Mevagissey, Looe, Newlyn and Falmouth, for instance. 

Where do you find mackerel?

Mackerel are a pelagic species which means they constantly roam the open seas. They are found at a range of depths and can be caught from the shore and offshore in boats. 

What size hooks for mackerel?

The most common sized hook for mackerel is a size 1O, but these are considered too large by many. There is a Japanese alternative to traditionally sized mackerel feathers which is far superior, called Sabiki feathers. 

Are mackerel in yet?

Mackerel are usually in from late April onwards but this varies by year and location. 

Do mackerel die after being handled?

Yes, a study has shown that after being handled mackerel die due to the burning of their skin from the natural oils in human hands. Wetting your hands does not help. 

What lures to use for mackerel?

The best lure for catching lots of mackerel are mackerel feathers or Sabiki feathers. The most fun way is arguably with a single spinner or a float rod fishing rod. 

What is the best bait for mackerel?

The best bait for catching mackerel is either a sandeel or strip of mackerel, but lures are also highly effective. I recommend the spinners listed on this page alongside Japanese Sabiki feathers for more hook ups. Fishing with baited mackerel feathers allows you to catch mackerel as well as other species. 

What is the best time to catch mackerel?

The best time to catch mackerel is dusk or dawn and at high tide. Spring high tides are often the best as they push bait fish closer into shore and the mackerel follow them in. Mackerel can be caught anytime, however. 

What tide is best for mackerel fishing?

The best tide for mackerel fishing is a spring high tide. These are tides when the difference between high water and low water is at its greatest, and the flow of water is strongest. Big tides push bait fish closer into shore and mackerel follow them in. 

What fish can you catch with a spinner?

Bass, mackerel, pollack and even wrasse will take spinners and other lures and can be effectively targeted in this way. Presentation and retrieval style is key and varies by species. 

What colour lure is best for mackerel?

Mackerels’ natural prey tend to be silvery white and therefore bright, shiny lures are often considered the best. These reflect light which increases their visibility to the fish. It’s often said that the colours of lures are there to catch the anglers rather than the fish!

What’s the best lure for mackerel fishing at night? 

The best lure for mackerel fishing at night is either a shiny lure to make the absolute most of whatever light is available, or a UV lure which glows in the dark. These lures are the best for fishing at night because they stand out so much more to the fish with their glow. In order for UV lures to work you must shine a light on them for a while first. 

What’s the best mackerel fishing gear? 

The best mackerel fishing gear is a simple spinning set up with an 8-9ft rod, 16lb monofilament line and mackerel feathers such as these Japanese sabiki feathers. The most fun way to catch mackerel however is with a light game set up. 

Best mackerel fishing lure length?

Mackerel do not have particularly large mouths relative to other species such as bass and pollack and a common mistake is to fish with lures which are too large. Avoid soft plastics with long paddle tails. 2 inches is perfect for mackerel fishing. 

Mackerel fishing off the beach?

You can fish for mackerel off the beach but this tends to work best at beaches where the water gets deep very quickly or when you know lots of bait fish are being pushed close into shore. 

What’s the best mackerel lure? 

The best mackerel lure in my opinion is a casting jig, which is like a highly evolved spinner. I recommend the one’s inspired by Japanese designs as these are designed to catch ‘agi’ which is in the mackerel family and is superior to most traditional lures.